35mm Lenses on the Fujifilm GFX 50S tested by Andy King

The following article is a guest post from Andy King and was first posted on akpo.ca (text and images reposted with permission). Andy tested a set of Full Frame lenses on the GFX. And the results are surprising as most of these lenses do work just fine on the GFX!

35mm Lenses on the Fujifilm GFX 50S
by Andy King

At Photokina 2016, Fujifilm shocked the photographic industry by announcing the production of the GFX 50S, a mirrorless medium format digital camera with a redesigned 44x33mm CMOS sensor. Unlike the Hasselblad X1D that was announced months prior, the GFX 50S sported both a focal-plane shutter and full electronic shutter. This game-changing feature meant that users could use any of their vintage medium format lenses onto the GFX 50S; the G mount system was now open to the vast ocean of lenses from the 19th century and onwards.

The design of a lens, focal length of a lens, aperture, number of elements, focus distance, default flange distance, size of the front and rear elements all contribute to the size of the image circle projected by the lens. A telephoto portrait lens with a large aperture would have relatively wide front and rear elements; resulting in a bigger image circle than the image format it was designed for. We can apply this knowledge to say that many 35mm lenses will cover the 44x33mm format of the GFX 50S.

In order to test out this theory, I had to first find a way to adapt 35mm lenses onto the GFX 50S. Being a mirrorless camera, the flange distance of the GFX 50S is a short 26.7mm. Canon EF lenses have a much longer flange distance of 44.0mm, meaning that if one creates an adapter wih a length of 17.3mm (the difference in flange), the adapted Canon EF lenses would retain the same focusing range on the GFX 50S as it would on any Canon EOS body (including the ability for infinity focus). Using the mount specifications of a GFX 50S brochure, I was able to 3D-print a prototype EF to G-mount adapter at the local library.

You may ask why anybody would use a lens designed for 35mm on a slightly larger imaging sensor (GFX 50S). The main reasons are image quality and artistic choice.  Smaller format lenses are generally designed to resolve more detail than larger format lenses.  All the tilt-shift 35mm lenses would cover the 44x33mm format, with room to spare for movements. A landscape or architecture photographer can use the shift feature to correct for perspective distortion, or for DoF control using tilt. 35mm lenses tend to have large apertures from f/0.95 and onwards, meaning they can be used for low light photography, or images with extremely thin DoF (portraiture, for example). The result of putting a 35mm portrait lens onto the GFX 50S may be swirly or soft corners, but many vintage and modern lenses are able to resolve the extreme corners of larger sensor quite well.

We tend to be inspired by medium and large format film photography for the unique and shallow DoF look. A Pentax 67 with a Takumar 105mm f/2.4 has a DoF equivalence of a 53mm f/1.2 lens on a 35mm camera (digital full-frame or film). The infamous Aero Ektar 178mm f/2.5 on 4×5″ has a 35mm DoF equivalence of 52mm f/0.7. To get a similar DoF equivalence, we would have to use a Zeiss/Jena Biotar 75mm f/1.5 on the GFX 50S (35mm DoF equivalence: 59mm f/1.2). We can assume that using large-aperture (f/0.95, f/1.2, f/1.4) lenses on the GFX 50S will allow us to get similar DoF equivalences of the 67 and large format cameras. By capturing more of the image circle drawn by a lens, we also capture more of the edge aberrations (distortion, cat’s eye bokeh, swirling, etc) of a lens and thus it’s unique rendering characteristics. The artistic choices we have as digital photographers are now endless.

Downtown Camera and Aden Camera organized events for interested photographers to try out the GFX 50S. I decided to bring the prototype adapter with the Sigma 85mm f/1.4, Canon 135mm f/2.0L, Canon 24mm f/3.5TS-Eii, and a Porst 50mm f/1.7 macro. The first demo day at Downtown Camera proved that my adapter couldn’t fit inside the G-mount, so I made some revisions and tried the lenses again at Aden Camera’s demo. The Sigma 85/1.4 covered the entire 44x33mm sensor with no noticeable vignetting, including infinity focus. Similarly, the Canon 24/3.5 had no noticeable vignetting at infinity, and the only vignetting appeared at full vertical shift. I noticed that there was a color shift (fixable with WB settings) in the image with extreme shift. The Canon 135/2.0 had vignetting at infinity and distant portrait distances, but the vignetting disappeared upon focusing to five meters or closer.

Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM (Click on image to see the full size version)

Canon 24mm f/3.5L TS-E II

Canon 135mm f/2.0L USM

Canon 135mm f/2.0L USM

Porst 50mm f/1.7 Macro

Canon 24mm f/3.5L TS-E II, full vertical shift (12mm)

I would like to give a big thanks to Fujifilm Canada, as well as Downtown Camera and Aden Camera in Toronto, for letting us try out the GFX 50S and allowing me conduct this test.

Download All images (Zip file)

Fuji GFX at BHphoto, Amazon and at Calumet Germany.

New Hasselblad X1D reviews by Thomas Ludwig and Michael Clark


Image courtesy Thomas Ludwig from Cosypeed

Thomas Ludwig writes:

Images have a very natural appearence. Colors are true to life and I have the feeling that one can see that medium format look. This might be subjective, but I think they have more plasticity than smaller sensors could deliver. I’m mostly happy with my micro 43 cameras, but these files play clearly in another league. The look, the colors, dynamic range and of course noise–simply amazing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Michael Clark writes:

The X1D reminds me a lot of the Mamiya 7II, which was one of my favorite medium format cameras ever. The X1D’s small size, straightforward, no-nonsense approach to photography, like all Hasselblad cameras, helps you to concentrate on the image and not on the camera. In other words the camera doesn’t get in the way of the image.

The X1D is on preorder at BHphoto, Adorama.

User review of the Fujifilm GFX 50S and GF63mm F2.8 by Keith Wee Kheng

The following is a guest post from Keith Wee Kheng (original article and images posted on Clubsnap and reposted with permission. Found via the GFX Facebook group). GFX 50S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.

User review of the Fujifilm GFX 50S and GF63mm F2.8
by Keith Wee Kheng

Early 2017 is turning out to be the year of Fujifilm’s many innovations.
Announced in June 2016, the first of Fujifilm’s foray into Medium Format is starting to ship, and of course, end up in the hands of users.
Before one questions why Medium format for Fujifilm, remember that Fujifilm has had a very good history of making glass for many manufacturers (Hasselblad included), and given its experience before digital, medium-format photography is actually a very natural progression.
The Fujifilm GFX 50S pairs the best features of Fujifilm’s X-series cameras with a madly intense 51.4MP sensor (43.8×32.9mm), while putting everything into a camera that, surprisingly, is smaller than a DSLR thats Full frame. Imagine everything Fujifilm X-mount has done, but now at least a notch higher in terms of imaging possibilities.

I’m not going to dvelve into specs here, if you are interested in specs on paper, here’s the link to follow: http://www.fujifilm.com/products/dig…ifilm_gfx_50s/

Thanks to the folks at Fujifilm Asia Pacific, I’ve had the wonderful opportunity to use the GFX 50S and the GF63mm F2.8 lens. (50mm equivalent)for a few days and I was very very impressed by the full works of it. The handling was superb for me coming up from Fujifilm X-mount with the dials, menu all aligned to the 3rd generation models such as the X-Pro2, X-T2 and X100F.

Operation was quick, snappy and Auto focus akin to the X-T1 camera series (if you’ve no idea, that’s very fast for a Medium format camera)The full exposure triangle’s setting can all be set without even switching on the camera, with direct access to Shutter Speed, ISO, Aperture values on physical dials.

Size wise, it already wins a Canon 5D Mark IV full-frame DSLR for compactness, thats how compact this medium-format camera is for starters.
I had the set with the kit EVF (non-tilting), and similarly, if one has been impressed by the X-T2’s 0.77x viewfinder churning out 100fps , the GFX’s will blow you away. Words don’t describe it. I had always felt the Leica SL’s to be the best in the market until I looked at the world through the GFX’s evf.

Some simple ‘to note’ for the few day’s experience.

1. I had a pre-prod set of the GFX 50S and GF63mm F2.8.
2. All photos are mostly JPEG SOCC, with minor edits done. There is no LR support for the GFX’s raw files yet.
3. I’m not a professional photographer, and don’t really any intentions to be one for I won’t survive. The X-photographers have shown the camera’s capability is churning our details in a studio setting and hence I decided to do something different – by using the medium format GFX as a everyday camera. Mad? I’ll share the reasons later.

Smooth is not a way most users describe a medium-format’s usage. But that was how it felt for me. No need for a studio , no need for posed shots, adding lights made good great and most of all, this beauty of a beast handles everything I threw at it.
I shot in rain, bad light good light low light, small spaces, motion – the camera never failed to impress me.
I wanted to show one thing, the GFX50S shoots everyday moments, and doesn’t require a studio to reside in.

She was sliding down, imagine the speed – yes, this was shot entirely using 2 clicks and in natural light.

the 50mm world, renewed
The contrast, I don’t understand what’s micro-contrast and to hell with the definitions, look at the separation.

Artsy yes, but same again, the motion and flow – all beautifully rendered.
With light, the good become great.
Full credits to bro Tiong Jin, who’s skills can transform a pigeon into a kingfisher.
I don’t understand the mechanics of bokeh, and this shot is just for those who love looking at balls.
have you ever wondered how deep the thoughts go in your kids?
woof
who says kids aren’t drawn by the medium format?

final impressions:

If one’s pockets can afford this, just do it. At every step, the GFX 50S impressed. One thing to note, I only loaned the GF63mm for a simple reason, portability. That said, the GF120mm F4 and GF32-64mm F4 are also excellent choices though size and weight wise they do go ahead.

That said, medium format isn’t for everyone coming to cost but I believe everyone should for once in their life, shoot a medium format just to be able to appreciate what it can do in imaging production and articulating your vision as a photographer, whether enthusiast or professional.

Written by Keith Wee Kheng (original article and images posted on Clubsnap. Found via the GFX Facebook group).

GFX System Camera & Lenses
GFX 50S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 63mm F/2.8 R WR Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 32-64mm F/4 R LM WR Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 120mm F/4 R LM OIS WR Macro Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.

GFX 50S Accessories at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm EVF-TL1 EVF Tilt Adapter for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm H Mount Adapter G, for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm RLCP-002 Rear Lens Cap for GFX Lenses at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm BCP-002 Body Cap for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm FLCP-62II Front Lens Cap fpr GF 63mm Lens at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm VG-GFX1 Vertical Battery Grip f/GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm NP-T125 Rechargeable Battery for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm BC-T125 Battery Charger for NP-T125 Battery at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm AC-15V AC Power Adapter for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.

Gordon Laing posts new Fuji GFX sample images, noise tests, video tour & hands-on impressions!

Gordon Laing from CameraLabs posted new Fuji GFX sample images, noise tests, video tour & hands-on impressions. This is his conclusion on the GFX noise performance:

I’d say virtually all the detail is retained between 100 and 400 ISO with only very minor smearing at 800 ISO reducing the ultimate fine details. There’s a bigger drop at 1600 ISO.
If you go back and look at my Canon EOS 5Ds noise results, you’ll see how the images become quite noisy at 800 ISO and for the best results you’ll really want to be shooting at 100 or 200 ISO. So the GXF 50S allows you to enjoy roughly similar 50 Megapixel resolving power, but at higher sensitivities before the quality begins to fall apart.

GFX System Camera & Lenses
GFX 50S Medium Format Mirrorless Camera at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 63mm F/2.8 R WR Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 32-64mm F/4 R LM WR Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm GF 120mm F/4 R LM OIS WR Macro Lens for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.

GFX 50S Accessories at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm EVF-TL1 EVF Tilt Adapter for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm H Mount Adapter G, for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm RLCP-002 Rear Lens Cap for GFX Lenses at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm BCP-002 Body Cap for GFX at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm FLCP-62II Front Lens Cap fpr GF 63mm Lens at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm VG-GFX1 Vertical Battery Grip f/GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm NP-T125 Rechargeable Battery for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm BC-T125 Battery Charger for NP-T125 Battery at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.
Fujifilm AC-15V AC Power Adapter for GFX 50S at Amazon, Adorama and BHphoto.

Leica M10 review at CameraJabber

Fuji did steal the spotlight on the new Leica M10 camera (available here at BHphoto or Adorama). The camera costs just like the Fuji GFX and this will make you think twice if you shouldn’t go Medium format instead. But I guess true Leica fans will appreciate the rangefinder mechanism and the super high quality compact body of the Leica.

To learn more about the camera you can watch the image samples posted on Dpreview and read the new review from CameraJabber:

Leica had a tricky job on its hands when attempting to update the Typ 240. It’s aim was to bring a camera that’s valued for its traditional build and focus on the essentials of photography a little more up to date. I think it’s done a very good job. The handling has been streamlined and the addition of a sensitivity dial means that you can check and adjust all the exposure settings without powering up the camera.
All things considered, the Leica M10 is an excellent upgrade to the Leica Typ 240. In the right hands it’s capable of producing very attractive images with lots of natural detail. It’s also built to last.